Stampery blockchain bitcoin

Two years ago, Luis Cuende identified this opportunity and founded Stampery, a company which uses blockchain technology to certify any digital document, thereby acting as a 21st century notary public. Cuende entered the technological entrepreneurial scene at an early. In , when he was just 12 years old, he founded Asturix, an association dedicated to open software which taught him that ""it is difficult to direct a collaborative project when there are no economic interests at play,"" he recalls. Therefore, when he proposed to launch what would be his seventh venture, the first thing he did was to conduct a study of the business areas which would benefit. Once a new block is accepted, it is impossible to modify it without anyone noticing.



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WATCH RELATED VIDEO: How does a blockchain work - Simply Explained

Blockchain solutions live in the Sharing Economy — FLOOW2 x Stampery


Blockchain or Distributed Ledger Technology seeks to address core concerns around transparency and trust that inhibit online transactions. While originally invented as an underlying ledger for Bitcoin cryptocurrency, it has spawned usage across diverse industries including governance, banking, finance, insurance, music, logistics, etc and business situations asset issuance, tracking, transfers, payments, remittance, settlement, etc.

While potential applications for Blockchain can be revolutionary, its real world adoption will continue to be constrained till society, law, businesses and technology fully understand its disruptive implications and devise safety mechanisms via common consensus.

Human beings are social animals and have lived in tight-knit societies to further their odds of survival in a hostile atmosphere. As social beings, humans have both competed and co-operated with fellow human beings in the face of common threats.

Over time, humans recognised that a safer and more beneficial way of using resources could be exchanging them without a fight, that is, via a trade transaction. This led to barter and exchange based understanding between them. In primitive societies, transactions involving exchange of say cattle or poultry would be consummated between individuals with the whole society as a witness.

Given small and proximate societies, such transactions would become common knowledge in the society. In modern trade, what essentially remains a basic peer-to-peer A-to-B transaction assumes complexity as geographical distance increases and the ability of participants to directly rely on one another reduces.

Record-keeping becomes paper-intensive and maintained by multiple parties: A, B and the intermediate parties. This has led to long clearing and settlement cycles extending to days, if not weeks, in case of cross-border transactions. Early trade started with barter, but human beings quickly realised need for a common measure or basis to conduct these transactions. Iwai discusses Commodity theory money has evolved spontaneously from one of the useful commodities through barter exchanges , Cartal theory money was introduced by community agreement or fiat, that is, money is a creature of law , bootstrap theory money is money simply because it is used as money and the gifting theory human beings are fundamentally an exchanging species with three simple obligations: to receive, to give and to reciprocate.

Banking, legal and accounting professions emerged to help with these functions. Transparency and common visibility of transaction amongst parties was an important part of successful consummation of early trades to ensure that all tribe members were aware of the transaction so parties to the transaction could not renege on it. Other examples of high transparency public displays of important events include coronations, birth showers, marriage and death rituals, peace treaties, convocation of degrees, etc.

As trade in goods and services became more common place within and across geographically dispersed locations, it became physically and technologically impossible for every trade to be broadcast across the population. Pseudo-transparent measures were introduced as substitutes, for example, advertisements in newspapers, public registration of private documents, access to public records, library copies.

However, these were only partial measures and did not permit smaller, simpler, relatively unimportant transactions to be advertised widely.

Advances in computing powers over the past few decades have revolutionised trade. As computers became prevalent and telecommunications advanced further, digitisation of records became possible.

Automation of existing processes led to significant productivity boost across industries. Most of the new systems automated underlying processes, without questioning or examining them in the light of new technology advancement. As such, many systems have evolved layered upon old technologies leading to a large amount of wastage and compromises. Fortunately, the same technology that has led to productivity boosts, also enabled information to be freely owned and disseminated.

Technology made it possible to widely and transparently disseminate information about bilateral deals, including small and unimportant transactions.

It became possible for anyone with an interest in a particular transaction to check and validate it. While superficially trivial, this has opened up a plethora of commercial processes and practices for re-examination. Welch studied how transparency and interactivity affect citizen trust in governments.

The findings indicate that internet use is positively associated with transparency satisfaction but negatively associated with interactivity satisfaction. Additionally, both transparency and interactivity are positively associated with trust in government indicating that transparency is a necessary but not sufficient trait for trust in governments. The same trait extends to the world of business and the corporations running them. The nature of money lends itself admirably to digitisation where the bank balance of an individual represented in a binary form entitle that individual to transfer part of it to purchase goods and services across the globe.

So, one half of all transactions very easily lend itself to digitisation. At the same time, tokenisation or title creation of goods and services permitted the second or physical leg of the transaction to also go digital. This opened up a whole era of internet proliferation, e-commerce, digital transactions and micropayments. A big problem on the internet has been to establish identity and trust securely.

Layers of cryptography and protocols have been designed to automate the patchwork of systems based on open access. Trusted entities appropriated transaction information and exploited it for their own use and profits. Technology has steered society away from transparency and common visibility and towards the realm of trust. Elia postulates that implementation and use of modern information technology tools to foster trust through transparency may be morally unsatisfactory unless they are accompanied by an explicit reference to potential threats or risks to stakeholder interests that are necessary moral protection for stakeholders in any business environment.

Current systems have evolved via automation of existing layers of inefficiencies over the ages. If examined afresh, advances in technology permit design of systems that enable ascendancy of transparency and push back advance of trust. The next few paragraphs explores a theoretical model for a system where transparency would take precedence over trust in business transactions. Most trade and service transactions involves two peers: A and B. With current technology, it becomes possible to reimagine record-keeping for this transaction so that reliance on trusted intermediaries is minimised.

Such wide publicity of the transaction itself could constitute proof of its existence. It would be akin to each party issuing a press release, in a standardised machine-readable format about the transaction. The features required in such a publicity are mentioned below. The participants would put personal marks or other identifiers for example, company seal that are unlikely to be in possession of a rogue actor.

Alternately, the two parties could issue a single joint press release with all the information under their common letterhead, company seal, both their websites, etc. They could verify that both press releases indeed contain personal identification marks and other identifiers that should be in their possession.

This would lead the witnesses to believe that the press release about the transaction is indeed released by the said parties. In case transaction details match, the witnesses would agree through a consensus that the transaction appears identical and originating from its purported participants.

This would make it even more difficult for parties to dispute transactions that are already accepted individually and in a block. This makes the chain strong and extremely difficult to revisit or dispute as more blocks are layered on top of the block containing a specific transaction. In , a pseudonymous individual or group , under the name Satoshi Nakamoto, proposed a scheme to create a digital currency called Bitcoin.

Nakamoto began with the idea of a peer-to-peer transaction in a world without trusted middlemen. Using advancements in computer science, market incentives and cryptography, Nakamoto proposed a system where any participant could transact, query and verify the state of a transaction in Bitcoin anonymously.

Nakamoto followed up his theoretical system with a working system in that led to the Bitcoin cryptocurrency and its underlying record-keeping technology, Blockchain. In order to incentivise nodes to perform POW by expending computing powers, Nakamoto proposed a reward for the miners.

This takes the form of a special transaction in a block that starts or creates a new coin to be owned by the mining node. A second incentive is payment of voluntary transaction fees by users for bundling their transactions into the block. The advantage of POW system is that so long as the network is majority controlled by honest nodes, the probability of an attacker catching up with the cumulative work of other nodes to propagate an inaccurate transaction or block diminishes exponentially as subsequent blocks are added.

Once a transaction is say 6 blocks deep it is computationally impractical for an attacker to reverse the transaction.

POW ensures a one-processor, one-vote paradigm thus incentivising new nodes to enter the network. Bitcoin Blockchain combines developments in software engineering, cryptography and game theory. Davidson identified that blockchain exploits. Bitcoin blockchain is an online, open, decentralised, transparent record of all dealings in bitcoin - every new bitcoin has to be mined, gets a unique ID and its life transaction is stored on it.

The blockchain identifies the total number of bitcoins in existence, its chain of transactions and where it currently resides. The record-keeping unit is the minted bitcoin and not the consumer.

The blockchain keeps track of every bitcoin and fraction thereof and follows it around to arrive at the current ownership.

The key pair is the construct from cryptography to ensure privacy for the consumer. In the physical world people interact amongst one another using physical currency. This currency note begins its life by being distributed via currency chests to banking intermediary then to individuals before being used in day to day transaction.

In this way it loses its own identity till it gets soiled and is returned to the RBI, whereupon RBI replaces this with a new currency and records the destruction of the old note via its unique ID number. Given its nature, the transactions remain anonymous. If one could record the entire life history of a currency note right from its printing, through all the change of hands it undergoes say through the use of Aadhaar ID , right till the time it is returned to RBI and destroyed, such a system could keep a record of every note ever minted and where it is currently resting.

Such a system would be the Indian equivalent of the blockchain. Table 1 lists some statistics around the bitcoin blockchain. The Bitcoin Blockchain over the years has proven to be robust and has withstood cryptographic scrutiny and adversary attacks while attracting more users, investors and participants. The computation power of the bitcoin blockchain computers comprising over nodes is eight times more powerful than the computational power of the most advanced supercomputers combined Cowley However, POW that consumes the bulk of this power, is a design component of bitcoin blockchain and cannot be easily tampered with.

The bitcoin blockchain would need to devise additional, stronger computational challenges to keep pace with quantum jump in computing prowess. If the trend continues, there could be a situation of a monopoly mining pool emerging and subverting the basic design of the system.

Additionally there is a concentration of hash power in a single country, namely, China with attendant geopolitical risks. In order to find acceptance as an industry utility, its internal organisation needs to be redefined. As such it has vast implications for usage across industries and transactions in public and private lives. Werbach discusses how blockchain could be the most consequential development in IT since internet by solving age-old human problem of trust through permitting users to trust the output of a system without trusting any actors within it.

He further identifies that challenges in blockchain are fundamentally a matter of governance rather than computer science. He envisages the need for law and blockchain to work together through cooperation rather than competition or conflict. Centralised solutions have the advantage of being efficient to create, establish and enforce rules but they tend to be expensive, monopolistic and prone to abuse over time. Blockchain can potentially disrupt any centralised database.

Davidson argues that blockchain as a public database is a revolution in institutions, governance and organisation rather than just a simple technological or monetary innovation. The authors point out that often entrepreneur or technological innovation led competition is met with political response, which while could not compete on cost alone, co-opt legislation or regulation to negate technological innovation models Williamson The authors invoke Transaction Cost Economics TCE Coase , to enquire why certain transactions take place in a market and certain others in an organised firm.

They posit that incomplete contracts occur only in an organised firm setting while complete contracts occur in a market.

Blockchain only operates on complete contracts and forces certain incomplete contracts away from organised firms towards open markets thereby extending the domain of the markets and reducing the operating space for firms.



Send Your Notaries on a Vacation, Says Stampery

Bitcoin Blockchain presents us with endless possibilities. Apart from being a ledger for bitcoin transactions, Blockchain has expanded to accommodate various applications. It is now being increasingly used to create proof of existence, intellectual property management, medical records management, smart contracts and even internet of technology applications. Blockchain provides a secure, transparent and economical way to file and manage documentation. Each non-transactional entry on the Blockchain will have its own hash key which can be used anytime to verify the authenticity of the document. It will also give document owners the authority to decide who can access the information associated with the entry.

Stampery Blockchain Timestamping Architecture (BTA) - Version 6 Lightweight and Manageable Digital Evidence Preservation System on Bitcoin.

Blockchain CG member proposals and reports

Blockchain or Distributed Ledger Technology seeks to address core concerns around transparency and trust that inhibit online transactions. While originally invented as an underlying ledger for Bitcoin cryptocurrency, it has spawned usage across diverse industries including governance, banking, finance, insurance, music, logistics, etc and business situations asset issuance, tracking, transfers, payments, remittance, settlement, etc. While potential applications for Blockchain can be revolutionary, its real world adoption will continue to be constrained till society, law, businesses and technology fully understand its disruptive implications and devise safety mechanisms via common consensus. Human beings are social animals and have lived in tight-knit societies to further their odds of survival in a hostile atmosphere. As social beings, humans have both competed and co-operated with fellow human beings in the face of common threats. Over time, humans recognised that a safer and more beneficial way of using resources could be exchanging them without a fight, that is, via a trade transaction. This led to barter and exchange based understanding between them.


A Journey into Bitcoin Metadata

stampery blockchain bitcoin

We use the Bitcoin and Ethereum blockchains to ensure the existence , integrity and attribution of all the data that is crucially important for our customers. The Ethereum blockchain is the forefront of distributed ledger technology allowing Stampery to achieve extremely fast settlement times. Both blockchains are powered by thousands and thousands of computers all around the world, and that's why public blockchains are so secure. Furthermore, you can only embed up to 80 bytes a short phrase on it.

The service can issue legally binding proofs for all your sensitive documents, and the company is presenting its next version on stage today at Disrupt SF. We use this technology to be able to generate this proof.

Luis Cuende

Over 10 years we help companies reach their financial and branding goals. Engitech is a values-driven technology agency dedicated. Microsoft Office just got some extraordinary features in the latest update. Office users can now use multiple blockchains to certify and sign important documents. Large corporations tend to store lots of contracts and legal documents in Microsoft Office.


Blockchain Revolution Series

The Stampery API allows you to prove the existence, integrity and ownership of all your data by anchoring embedding unique identifiers hashes of your files and datasets into the Ethereum and Bitcoin blockchains. The timestamps and proofs generated by this API are independently verifiable at no cost by anyone in the world, and they will be valid forever—even if Stampery disappeared. Learn more about Target Frameworks and. NET Standard. This package is not used by any popular GitHub repositories. Skip To Content.

More and more companies are openly showing their support for Ethereum Classic. To the majority of enterprises in the cryptocurrency world, supporting ETC.

Stampery uses the bitcoin blockchain to provide reliable and unspoofable proofs of ownership, proofs of existence, and proofs of integrity at a minimal cost. Because the blockchain is distributed and decentralized, any third party can verify the proof at any time. Stampery BTA is the only blockchain that meets unlimited data anchoring, making it one of the most secure in the universe. To ensure that all data is accurate, reliable, and attributed to our customers, we use the Ethereum and Bitcoin blockchains.


April 10th, 2. This is just one of many blockchain related projects at Microsoft. Stampery provides the ability to certify and verify documents against both Ethereum Classic and Bitcoin blockchains via a web page and also through a programmatic API. They wanted to improve their enterprise customer reach by adding Microsoft Office as a client in their present solution. Enterprise organizations keep many important records in Office, such as contracts and other legal documents.

Launches Ethereum Witnet posted 3 years ago. Token Daily.

Stampery enables users to certify the existence, integrity, and ownership of data used on the Bitcoin and Ethereum blockchains. Stampery provides blockchain data certification services. They enable users to certify the existence, integrity, and ownership of data used on the Bitcoin and Ethereum blockchains. Because of the distributed and decentralized nature of the blockchains, the data on it can be verified by anybody at any time. Stampery uses the information transmitted on the bitcoin blockchain to generate dependable proof of existence, proof of integrity, and proof of ownership. Stampery's API lets users prove the existence, ownership and integrity of all their data by inserting unique identifiers for their files and data directly into the blockchains. The timestamps created by Stampery's API can be verified independently by anyone.

In May of , news broke that the Government of Honduras was working with Factom and Epigraph to build a land registry system using the blockchain technology that powers the controversial cryptocurrency Bitcoin according to press releases This sparked considerable interest regarding how blockchain technology might be applied to land administration, with claims that it might revolutionize land information management. Over the course of however, little additional, detail regarding the venture in Honduras was progressing, culminating in a press release in December stating that the project was not as far along, nor at the scale, that was originally stated. Regardless, the question of applicability of blockchain for land had entered the public domain, and numerous organizations have begun to look seriously at how they might apply the technology This paper delves into: a the blockchain technology; b its advantages, disadvantages, and upcoming trends; c its relevance to land administration, and d a proposed roadmap to test this technology in the context of donor-funded land administration projects. Blockchain technology is a distributed database maintaining an immutable public ledger of all transactions.


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